Press Release

2013

Discovery of Hot Oxygen Gas Streaming Away from Distant Galaxies: Witnessing the Final Stage of Galaxy Buildup
Discovery of Hot Oxygen Gas Streaming Away from Distant Galaxies: Witnessing the Final Stage of Galaxy Buildup December 10, 2013

An international team of astronomers has used the Subaru Prime Focus Camera to make the first discovery of the large physical extent of energetic oxygen-gas outflows driven by a super-massive black hole and star formation. The team found 12 galaxies, 9 billion light years from Earth, that are expelling hot oxygen gas extending up to 250,000 light years beyond the galaxies' areas. These distant galaxies are probably in their final phase of growth, with star formation being quenched by the expulsion of gas needed to produce new stars.

More
Marching to the Beat: Subaru's FMOS Reveals the Well-Orchestrated Growth of Massive Galaxies in the Early Universe
Marching to the Beat: Subaru's FMOS Reveals the Well-Orchestrated Growth of Massive Galaxies in the Early Universe December 5, 2013

Using the Fiber-Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope, a team of astronomers participating in the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) has found that galaxies, over nine billion years ago, provided a nurturing environment for the birth of new stars at remarkable, orderly rates. Even at these early times, there are signs of maturation.

More
Astronomers Establish the Strength of High-Inclination Asteroids
Astronomers Establish the Strength of High-Inclination Asteroids November 4, 2013

A team of astronomers used the Subaru Prime Focus Camera to observe faint asteroids with highly inclined orbits. They found that a smaller fraction of tiny bodies occur among high-inclination asteroids than those near the ecliptic plane. This means that large asteroids in high velocity collisions between asteriods probably have a greater increase of strength in resisting disruption than those in the present mean-velocity collisions.

More
Blue Light Observations Indicate Water-Rich Atmosphere of a Super-Earth
Blue Light Observations Indicate Water-Rich Atmosphere of a Super-Earth September 3, 2013

A Japanese research team has used Subaru Telescope's Suprime-Cam and the Faint Object Camera and Spectrograph (FOCAS) with a blue transmission filter to observe planetary transits of super-Earth GJ 1214 b. The team investigated whether this planet has an atmosphere rich in water or hydrogen. Because the Subaru observations show that the planet does not display a strong Rayleigh scattering feature, they conclude that GJ 1214 b is likely to have a water-rich atmosphere.

More
A Fluffy Disk Around a Baby Star
A Fluffy Disk Around a Baby Star August 22, 2013

Astronomers that are members of the SEEDS Project have used the Subaru Telescope to observe a disk around the young star RY Tau. The team's analysis of the disk shows that a "fluffy" layer above it is responsible for the scattered light observed in the infrared image. Detailed comparisons with computer simulations of scattered light from the disk reveal that this layer appears to be a remnant of material from an earlier phase of stellar and disk development.

More
Subaru Telescope's Imaging Discovery of a Second Jupiter Shows the Power and Significance of the SEEDS Project
Subaru Telescope's Imaging Discovery of a Second Jupiter Shows the Power and Significance of the SEEDS Project August 4, 2013

Astronomers in the Strategic Explorations of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) Project have recently discovered and captured an image of the least massive planet ever imaged so far--a so-called "second Jupiter". This discovery marks an important step toward the direct imaging of much fainter Earth-like planets in the future and may lead to new models of planet formation. It also illustrates the important role that the SEEDS project plays in observational astronomy.

More
Cosmic Giants Shed New Light on Dark Matter
Cosmic Giants Shed New Light on Dark Matter June 12, 2013

An international team of astronomers has used the Subaru Telescope to measure the distribution of dark matter in fifty galaxy clusters and found that its density gradually decreases from the center of these cosmic giants to their diffuse outskirts. This new evidence about the mysterious dark matter that pervades our Universe conforms to the predictions of cold dark matter theory, known as "CDM".

More
Subaru Telescope Observations and the CoRoT Mission Unveil the Future of the Sun
Subaru Telescope Observations and the CoRoT Mission Unveil the Future of the Sun May 17, 2013

A team of astronomers has found the farthest known solar twin in the Milky Way Galaxy-- CoRoT Sol 1, which has about the same mass and chemical composition as the Sun. Spectra from the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) on the Subaru Telescope showed that CoRoT Sun 1 is about 6.7 billion years old while space-derived data from the CoRoT satellite indicated a rotation period of 29 +/- 5 days. This newly discovered, evolved solar twin allows astronomers to uncover the near future of the Sun.

More
Discovery of a Blue Supergiant Star Born in the Wild
Discovery of a Blue Supergiant Star Born in the Wild April 10, 2013

A duo of astronomers has discovered a blue supergiant star located far beyond our Milky Way Galaxy in the constellation Virgo. Over fifty-five million years ago, the star emerged in an extremely wild environment: within the long trail of gas stripped from galaxy IC 3418 as it sped rapidly into the Virgo cluster and interacted with the hot plasma of the surrounding intra-cluster medium. The research revealed unprecedented views of the star formation process in this intergalactic context and showed the promise of future investigations of a possibly new mode of star formation, unlike that within our Milky Way.

More
Gravitational Lensing in the Peculiar "Magatama" Galaxy
Gravitational Lensing in the Peculiar "Magatama" Galaxy March 31, 2013

A team of astronomers has investigated the effect of gravitational lensing on the properties of the background galaxy in an overlapping system of two young galaxies lying in an extremely close line of sight. The two galaxies were once thought to be a single strangely shaped galaxy that looked like a "magatama", an ancient, comma-shaped Japanese amulet made of stone. The team's research showed that the effect of gravitational amplification would be 20% at most and that the gravitational lensing effect from the young foreground galaxy does not affect the luminosity of its background galaxy.

More
Soccer Balls in Interstellar Space
Soccer Balls in Interstellar Space March 5, 2013

An international team of astronomers led by Masaaki Otsuka has detected the C60 fullerene (molecules of carbon with 60 atoms arranged in patterns resembling a soccer ball) in the dying star M1-11. Data from the Subaru Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, the Very Large Telescope, the 1.88 m telescope at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, and the Japanese infrared astronomy satellite AKARI all contributed to this finding, which takes scientists closer to understanding the prevalence and formation of C60 in space.

More
3-D Observations of the Outflow from an Active Galactic Nucleus
3-D Observations of the Outflow from an Active Galactic Nucleus
February 18, 2013

A Japanese team of astronomers has used the Subaru Telescope to observe a distant gravitationally-lensed quasar and probed an active galactic nucleus in its central region. Looking through multiple sight lines, the astronomers obtained a 3-D view of the quasar and discovered complex small structures inside the outflows from the galactic nucleus. These outflows will spread widely and eventually affect the evolution of the host galaxy.

More
Direct Infrared Image of an Arm in Disk Demonstrates Transition to Planet Formation
Direct Infrared Image of an Arm in Disk Demonstrates Transition to Planet Formation
February 7, 2013

An international team of astronomers has used the Subaru Telescope to capture the first vivid infrared image of a curved arm of dust extending over a hole in a disk around a young star (J 1604). This feature indicates the probable existence of unseen planets within the hole. The image shows the dynamic environment in which planets may be born and gives information about constraints on the distance at which planets can form from a central star.

More
The Origin and Maintenance of a Retrograde Exoplanet
The Origin and Maintenance of a Retrograde Exoplanet January 24, 2013

Astronomers have used the Subaru Telescope to show that the HAT-P-7 planetary system, which is about 1040 light years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus, includes at least two giant planets and one companion star. The discovery of a previously unknown companion (HAT-P-7B) to the central star (HAT-P-7) as well as confirmation of another giant planet (HAT-P-7c) orbiting outside of the retrograde planet HAT-P-7b offer new insights into how retrograde planets may form and endure.

More
Shedding Light on the Power of M82's Superwinds
Shedding Light on the Power of M 82's Superwinds January 18, 2013

An international team of astronomers has discovered that outflows of gas from starburst galaxy M82 collide with a "cap" of gas clouds 40,000 light years away from the galactic disk. Shockwaves from M82's central starburst region are the most likely source of the bright clouds within the cap. This research provides an important clue about the wind's power.

More


Guidelines for use

document navigation

local navigation

Press Release